List of minor Hebrew Bible figures, L–Z

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This article contains persons named in the Bible, specifically in the Hebrew Bible and Old Testament, of minor notability, about whom little or nothing is known, aside from some family connections. Here are the names which start with L-Z; for A-K see there.

L[edit]

Laadah[edit]

Laadah (Hebrew: לאדה) is one of the sons of Shelah, son of Judah (son of Jacob) in 1 Chronicles 4:21.

Laadan[edit]

See Libni

Ladan[edit]

See Libni

Lael[edit]

Lael (Hebrew לָאֵל "belonging to God") was a member of the house of Gershon according to Numbers 3:24. He was the father of Eliasaph. Neither of these is named in the Gershonite list in 1 Chronicles 23:7–11.

Lahmi[edit]

Lahmi, according to 1 Chronicles 20:5, was the brother of Goliath, killed by David's warrior Elhanan. See also Elhanan, son of Jair.

Laish[edit]

This entry is about the individual named Laish. For the city Dan, known also as Laish, see Dan (ancient city).

Laish is a name which appears in 1 Samuel 25:44 and 2 Samuel 3:15, where it is the name of the father of Palti, or Paltiel, the man who was married to Saul's daughter Michal before she was returned to David.

Lapidoth[edit]

Lapidoth was the husband of Deborah, the fourth judge of Israel, according to Judges 4:4.

Letushim[edit]

Letushim appears as a son of Dedan according to Genesis 25:3.

Leummim[edit]

Leummim (Hebrew: לְאֻמִּים) was the third son of Dedan, son of Jokshan, son of Abraham by Keturah (Genesis 25:3).

Libni[edit]

Libni (Hebrew לִבְנִי) was a son of Gershon of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:17 and Numbers 3:18. He was born in Egypt. His descendants are referred to as the 'Libnites'.[1] The first born son of Gershon is named as Laadan (or Ladan) in 1 Chronicles 23:7–9.

Likhi[edit]

Likhi son of Shemida is listed in a genealogy of the tribe of Manasseh. He is mentioned only in 1 Chronicles 7:19.[2]

Lo-Ammi[edit]

Lo-Ammi (Hebrew for "not my people") was the youngest son of Hosea and Gomer. He had an older brother named Jezreel and an older sister named Lo-Ruhamah. God commanded Hosea to name him "Lo-Ammi" to symbolize his anger with the people of Israel (see Hosea 1:19).

Lo-Ruhamah[edit]

Lo-Ruhamah (Hebrew for "not loved") was the daughter of Hosea and Gomer. She had an older brother named Jezreel and a younger brother named Lo-Ammi. Her name was chosen by God to symbolize his displeasure with the people of Israel (see Hosea 1:19).

M[edit]

Maadai[edit]

Maadai, son of Bani is found in Ezra 10:34, in a list of men recorded as having married foreign women.

Maadiah[edit]

Maadiah appears in a list of priests and Levites said to have accompanied Zerubbabel in Nehemiah 12:5.

Maai[edit]

Maai (Hebrew: מָעַי) was a musician who was a relative of Zechariah, a descendant of Asaph. He is mentioned once, as part of the ceremony for the dedication of the rebuilt Jerusalem wall (Nehemiah 12:36), where he was part of the group that processed southwards behind Ezra.[3] His name is omitted in the Septuagint translation of the passage, as are the names of five other relatives of Zechariah mentioned in the same verse.[4] The name is otherwise unattested.[5] Blenkinsopp suggests that Maai is a diminutive nickname.[5] Mandel proposes its Hebrew origin means "sympathetic".[6]

Maaseiah[edit]

Several men called Maaseiah (Hebrew מַעֲשֵׂיָה or מַעֲשֵׂיָהוּ maaseyah(u) "Work of YHWH") are mentioned in the Bible:

  • One of the Levites whom David appointed as porter for the ark 1 Chronicles 15:18, 1 Chronicles 15:20
  • One of the "captains of hundreds" associated with Jehoiada in restoring king Jehoash to the throne 2 Chronicles 23:1
  • The "king's son", probably one of the sons of king Ahaz, killed by Zichri in the invasion of Judah by Pekah, king of Israel 2 Chronicles 28:7
  • One who was sent by king Josiah to repair the temple 2 Chronicles 34:8. He was governor (Heb. sar, rendered elsewhere in the Authorized Version "prince," "chief captain", chief ruler") of Jerusalem.
  • The father of the priest Zephaniah Jeremiah 21:1, 37:3
  • The father of the false prophet Zedekiah Jeremiah 29:21
  • a priest, the father of Neriah Jeremiah 32:12, 51:59
  • The son of Shallum, "the keeper of the threshold" (Jeremiah 35:4) "may be the father of the priest Zephaniah mentioned in [Jeremiah] 21:1; 29:25; 37:3".[7]
  • One of the sons of Jeshua who had married a foreign wife during the exile (Ezra 10:18).

Maasiai[edit]

Hebrew for "Worker of Yahweh", one of the priests resident at Jerusalem at the Captivity 1 Chronicles 9:12

Maaz[edit]

Maaz was one of the sons of Ram the firstborn of Jerahmeel. His brothers were: Jamin and Eker. He is mentioned briefly in 1 Chronicles 2:27.

Maaziah[edit]

Machbanai[edit]

Hebrew for "Clad with a mantle", one of the Gadite heroes who joined David in the wilderness 1 Chronicles 12:13

Machbena[edit]

Machbena or Machbenah, according to the only mention of him, in 1 Chronicles 2:49, was the son of Sheva the son of Caleb.

Machi[edit]

Machi of the tribe of Gad was the father of Geuel, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:15.

Machnadebai[edit]

Machnadebai is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible only once, in Ezra 10:40, where the name appears in a list of people alleged to have married foreign women.[8]

Magpiash[edit]

Magpiash, according to Nehemiah 10:20, was one of the men who signed a covenant between God and the people of Yehud Medinata.

Mahalath[edit]

  1. Mahalath, one of the wives of Esau, and a daughter of Ishmael (Genesis 28:6–9). Thought to be the same as Basemath of Genesis 36.
  2. Mahalath, a daughter of Jerimoth, son of David and Abihail, granddaughter of Jesse, the first-named wife of king Rehoboam in 2 Chronicles 11:18. She had three children: Jeush, Shamariah, and Zaham.

Mahali[edit]

Mahali (also Mahli) was a son of Merari of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:19, born in Egypt.

Mahath[edit]

Hebrew for "Grasping"

Mahazioth[edit]

Heb. "Visions", a Kohathite Levite, chief of the twenty-third course of musicians 1 Chronicles 25:4,1 Chronicles 25:30

Maher-shalal-hash-baz[edit]

Maher-shalal-hash-baz ("Hurry to spoil!" or "He has made haste to the plunder!") was the second mentioned son of the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 8.1–4). The name is a reference to the impending plunder of Samaria and Damascus by the king of Assyria. The name is the longest personal name in the Bible.

Mahlah[edit]

Mahlah is the name of two biblical persons:

Mahol[edit]

The father of four sons 1 Kings 4:31 who were inferior in wisdom only to Solomon.

Malcam[edit]

For the deity sometimes called Malcam, Malcham, or Milcom, see Moloch.

Malcam (King James Version spelling Malcham) son of Shaharaim appears only once in the Hebrew Bible in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin.[9][10]

Malchiel[edit]

Malchiel (Hebrew מַלְכִּיאֵל "my king is God") was a son of Beriah the son of Asher, according to Genesis 46:17 and Numbers 26:45. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob. According to 1 Chronicles 7:31, he was the ancestor of the Malchielites, a group within the Tribe of Asher.

Malchishua[edit]

Heb. "King of help" or "King of salvation", one of the four sons of Saul (1 Chronicles 8:33). He perished along with his father and brothers in the battle of Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:2).

Malchiah[edit]

Malchiah (Hebrew: מלכיהו malkiyahu "God is my king") son of the king (Jeremiah 38:6), owner of the pit into which Jeremiah was thrown

Mallothi[edit]

A Kohathite Levite, one of the sons of Heman the Levite (1 Chronicles 25:4), and chief of the nineteenth division of the temple musicians 1 Chronicles 25:26

Malluch[edit]

There are two biblical figures named Malluch

Manahath[edit]

Manahath is one of the sons of Shobal. His brothers names were: Ebal, Shepho, Onam, and Alvan (Genesis 36:23).

Maon[edit]

According to 1 Chronicles 2:45, Maon was a member of the clan of Caleb, the son of Shammai and the father of Beth Zur.

Marsena[edit]

Marsena appears in Esther 1:14 as one of seven Persian and Medean princes.[11] Marsena also advised King Ahasuerus. See also: Carshena. There exists the presumption that both counselors have Persian names.

Mash[edit]

Mash was a son of Aram according to Genesis 10:23. In Arabic traditions, Mash is considered the father of Nimrod (not Nimrod bin Kush bin Kanan), who begot Kinan, who in turn begot another Nimrod, and the lattermost's descendants mixed with those of Asshur (i.e. Assyrians).[12] Tse Tsan-Tai identifies his descendants with the indigenous peoples of Siberia.[13]

Massa[edit]

Hebrew word meaning tribute or burden, one of the sons of Ishmael, the founder of an Arabian tribe (Gen. 25:14); a nomadic tribe inhabiting the Arabian desert toward Babylonia.

Matred[edit]

Matred, according to Genesis 36:39 and 1 Chronicles 1:50, was the mother-in-law of the Edomite king Hadad II.[14]

Matri[edit]

Matri, of the Tribe of Benjamin, was an ancestor of Saul according to I Samuel 10:21. Matri's clan, or the family of the Matrites, was chosen, and, from them, Saul the son of Kish was chosen to be king. The family of the Matrites is nowhere else mentioned in the Hebrew Bible; the conjecture, therefore, is that Matri is probably a corruption of Bikri, i.e. a descendant of Becher (Genesis 46:21).[15]

Mattan[edit]

Mattan (Mathan in the Douay–Rheims translation) was a priest of the temple of Baal in Jerusalem who was killed during the uprising against Athaliah when King Azariah's remaining son, Jehoash, was appointed king of Judah (2 Kings 11:18).

Mattattah[edit]

Mattattah (KJV: Mattathah) was one of the descendants of Hashum mentioned in Ezra 10:33 along with Mattenai, Zabda, Eliphelet, Jeremai, Manasseh and Shimei who married foreign wives.

Matthanias[edit]

Two men called Matthanias are mentioned in 1 Esdras, one each mentioned in 1 Esdras 9:27 and 9:31. In both passages, the parallel text in Ezra 10:26 and 10:30 contains the name Mattaniah.[16]

Mehetabeel[edit]

Mehetabeel ("Whom God benefits" or "God causes good") was the father of Delaiah, and grandfather of Shemaiah, who joined Sanballat against Nehemiah (Nehemiah 6:10).

Mehetabel[edit]

Mehetabel ("מהיטבאל") ("Whom God benefits" or "God causes good") was the wife of Hadad, one of the kings of Edom (Genesis 36:39).

Mehir[edit]

Mehir son of Chelub appears in a genealogy of the Tribe of Judah in 1 Chronicles 4:11.

Mehujael[edit]

Mehujael as depicted in the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493).

In Genesis 4:18, Mehujael (Hebrew: מְחוּיָאֵלMəḥūyāʾēl or מְחִיּיָאֵל‎; Greek: ΜαιηλMaiēl) is a descendant of Cain, the son of Irad and the father of Methushael. The name means "El (or) the god enlivens."[17]

Mehuman[edit]

Faithful, one of the eunuchs whom Ahasuerus commanded to bring in Vashti (Esther 1:10).

Persian "مهمان signifies a stranger or guest"[18]

Melatiah[edit]

Melatiah the Gibeonite is a person who, according to Nehemiah 3:7, was responsible for rebuilding a portion of the wall of Jerusalem after the end of the Babylonian captivity.

Melech[edit]

King, the second of Micah's four sons 1 Chronicles 8:35), and thus grandson of Mephibosheth. Also related to a southwest Asian god, see Melech

Melzar[edit]

Probably a Persian word meaning master of wine, i.e., chief butler; the title of an officer at the Babylonian court Daniel 1:11, Daniel 1:16 who had charge of the diet of the Hebrew youths. Daniel had a providential relationship of "favour and tender love" with Melzar (Daniel 1:9).

Merab[edit]

Merab was the eldest of Saul's two daughters (1 Samuel 14:49). She was offered in marriage to David after his victory over Goliath, but does not seem to have entered heartily into this arrangement (1 Samuel 18:17–19). She was at length, however, married to Adriel of Abel-Meholah, a town in the Jordan valley, about 10 miles south of Bethshean (Beit She'an), with whom the house of Saul maintained an alliance. She had five sons, who were all put to death by the Gibeonites on the hill of Gibeah (2 Samuel 21:8). Merab is also a common feminine name in Israel.

Meraiah[edit]

A chief priest, a contemporary of the high priest Joiakim (Neh 12:12).

Meraioth[edit]

  • Father of Amariah, a priest of the line of Eleazar (1 Chronicles 6:6–7), (1 Chronicles 6:52). It is uncertain if he ever was the high priest.
  • A priest who went to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:15). He is called Meremoth in Neh 12:3.

Meremoth[edit]

A priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:3), to whom were sent the sacred vessels (Ezra 8:33) belonging to the temple. He took part in rebuilding the walls of Jerusalem (Neh 3:4).

Meres[edit]

Meres is listed in Esther 1:14 as one of seven officials in the service of Ahasuerus.

Meshelemiah[edit]

A Levite of the family of the Korhites, called also Shelemiah (1 Chronicles 9:21),(1 Chronicles 26:1–14) He was a temple gate-keeper in the time of David.

Meshillemoth[edit]

Two men called Meshillemoth (in one case spelled Meshillemith) are mentioned in the Bible.[19]

  • The father of Berechiah, a member of the Tribe of Ephraim during the time when Pekah was king.[20]
  • A priest, the son of Immer.[21] He is called "Meshillemoth" in 1 Chronicles 9:12.[19]

Meshullam[edit]

See Meshullam

Meshullemeth[edit]

The wife of King Manasseh of Judah, and the mother of King Amon of Judah (2 Kings 21:19).

Methusael[edit]

In Genesis 4:18, Methusael or Methushael (Hebrew: מְתוּשָׁאֵלMəṯūšāʾēl) is a descendant of Cain, the son of Mehujael and the father of Lamech.

Mezahab[edit]

The father of Matred (Gen 36:39),(1 Chronicles 1:50), and grandfather of Mehetabel, wife of Hadar, the last king of Edom.

Miamin[edit]

See Mijamin

Mibhar[edit]

A Hagarene, one of David's warriors (1 Chronicles 11:38); called also Bani the Gadite (2 Samuel 23:36).

Mibsam[edit]

Mibzar[edit]

Mibzar was an Edomite clan (possibly named after an eponymous chieftain) mentioned in Genesis 36:31-43.

Michael[edit]

Michael (is the masculine given name that comes from Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל / מיכאל (Mīkhāʼēl, pronounced [miχaˈʔel]), derived from the question מי כאל mī kāʼēl, meaning "Who is like God?") is the name of 8 minor biblical individuals besides from the Archangel Michael.

Michaiah[edit]

Two men called Michaiah (Hebrew: מיכיה Mikayah "Who is like Yah?") are mentioned in the Bible:

  • Michaiah, son of Imri (q.v.)
  • Michaiah, the son of Gemariah, the son of Shaphan (Jeremiah 36:11), who heard Baruch's reading of the oracles of YHVH to Jeremiah, and reported to king Johoiakim

Michri[edit]

"Prize of Jehovah" or "Selling", a Benjamite, the father of Uzzi (1 Chronicles 9:8).

Mijamin[edit]

Three men called Mijamin (also spelled Miamin, Miniamin, Minjamin) ("from the right hand") are mentioned in the Bible:

  • The head of the sixth of twenty four priestly divisions set up by King David. (1 Chronicles 24:9)
  • A chief priest who returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:5), who signed the renewed covenant with God. (Nehemiah 10:8) In the time of Joiakim his family had joined with that of Moadiah, and was led by Piltai. He was also called Miniamin. (Neh 12:17)
  • A non-priestly Mijamin son of Parosh is mentioned in Ezra 10:25 as one of those who divorced a gentile wife, and sacrificed a ram in atonement.

Mikloth[edit]

  1. An officer under Dodai, in the time of David and Solomon (1 Chronicles 27:4).
  2. A Benjamite (1 Chronicles 8:32),(1 Chronicles 9:37), (1 Chronicles 9:38).

Milalai[edit]

A Levitical musician (Neh 12:36) who took part in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem.

Miniamin[edit]

Miniamin (or Mijamin) was one of the agents appointed under Kore in the time of King Hezekiah to distribute a share of the plenty to the priests in the Levitical cities of Judah (2 Chronicles 31:15.

Minjamin[edit]

See Mijamin

Mishael[edit]

Two men called 'Mischael (Hebrew מִישָׁאֵל 'Who is like God (El)?') are mentioned in the Bible:

Mishael was a son of Uzziel of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:22, born in Egypt. He was a nephew of Amram and a cousin of Aaron, Miriam, and Moses. He and Elzaphan were asked by Moses to carry away Nadab's and Abihu's bodies to a place outside the camp. (Leviticus 10:4)

Mishael was one of the three Hebrew youths who were trained with Daniel in Babylon (Dan. 1:11, 19). He and his companions were cast into and miraculously delivered from the fiery furnace for refusing to worship the king's idol (3:13–30). Mishael's Babylonian name was Meshach.

Mishma[edit]

Mishma, son of Simeon (1 Chron. 4:25–26).

Mishmannah[edit]

(Hebrew מִשְׁמַנָּה) one of the Gadite heroes who gathered to David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:10).

Mithredath[edit]

(Hebrew: מִתְרְדָת; Greek: Μιθραδάτης; Latin: Mithridates) The Hebrew form of the Persian name Mithridates meaning 'given/dedicated to the sun'.[22]

Moab[edit]

Moab was the son of Lot and his eldest daughter. He became the father of the Moabites (see Genesis 19:36–37).

Molid[edit]

(Hebrew מוֹלִיד)

Moza[edit]

(Hebrew מוֹצָא)

Muppim[edit]

Muppim (Hebrew מֻפִּים) or Shuphim was the eighth son of Benjamin in Genesis 46:21 and Numbers 26:39.

Mushi[edit]

Mushi (Hebrew מוּשִׁי) was a son of Merari of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:19, born in Egypt.

N[edit]

Naam[edit]

Naam was one of the sons of Caleb son of Jephunneh. (1 Chronicles 4:15) His brothers were Iru and Elam.

Naaman[edit]

Naaman is the fifth son of Benjamin in Genesis 46:21, but the son of Bela and therefore the grandson of Benjamin according to Numbers 26:38-40 and 1 Chronicles 8:4 He is not mentioned among the sons of Bela in 1 Chronicles 7:7.

Naarah[edit]

According to the Hebrew Bible, Naarah was one of the two wives of Ashur the son of Hezron which bore Ashur: Ahuzam, Hepher, Temeni and Haahashtari according to 1 Chronicles 4:6.

Naboth[edit]

Naboth was a minor figure known for owning a vineyard that king Ahab wished to have for himself. When Naboth was unwilling to give up the vineyard, Ahab's wife Jezebel instigated a plot to have Naboth killed. See 1 Kings 21.

Nadab[edit]

Nadab is the name of 4 biblical individuals

Naharai[edit]

Naharai (or Nahari) the Beerothite is listed in 2 Samuel 23:37 and 1 Chronicles 11:39 as one of David's Mighty Warriors.[23]

Nahath[edit]

Three men called Nahath appear in the Bible.[24]

  • Nahath, son of Reuel, son of Esau appears in a genealogy of the Edomites, found in Genesis 36:13 and repeated in 1 Chronicles 1:37. According to the Encyclopaedia Biblica', this Nahath is probably the same figure as the Naham of 1 Chronicles 4:19 and the Naam of 1 Chronicles 4:15.[24]
  • A Nahath appears in the ancestry of Samuel according to 1 Chronicles 6:26 (verse 11 in some Bibles).
  • A Nahath appears in a list of Levite supervisors in the time of Hezekiah, in 2 Chronicles 31:13

Nahbi[edit]

Nahbi, the son of Vophsi of the house of Naphtali, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:14.

Naphish[edit]

Naphish (once Nephish in the King James Version) is one of the sons of Ishmael. After him an Ishmaelite tribe is named.[25] The name נפיש in Hebrew means "refreshed".[26] His tribe is listed with Jetur, and is assumed to have resided nearby and lived a nomadic, animal-herding lifestyle in sparsely populated land east of the Israelites.[27] Psalm 83,[28][29] however lists these as Hagarites separately from the other ten tribes which lived more southernly.

Naphtuhim[edit]

Naphtuhim is a son of Mizraim and grandson of Ham first mentioned in Genesis 10:13. According to the medieval biblical exegete, Saadia Gaon, his descendants inhabited the town of Birma (Al Gharbiyah region, Egypt), and were formerly known as Parmiin.[30]

Neariah[edit]

Two men called "Neariah" appear in the Bible. Neariah the son of Shemaiah, was a descendant of David, and father of Elionenai (1 Chronicles 3:22). The other Neariah was, according to 1 Chronicles, a leader in the Tribe of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:42).

Nebat[edit]

Nebat (Hebrew: נבט nebat "Sprout", Douay–Rheims: Nabat), an Ephraimite of Zereda, was the father of King Jeroboam.[31]

Nebuzaradan[edit]

Nebuzaradan (the biblical form of his name, derived from the Babylonian form Nabu-zar-iddin, meaning "Nabu has given a seed")[32] was the captain of Nebuchadnezzar's bodyguard, according to the Bible. He is mentioned in 2 Kings 25:8, 11, 20;Jeremiah 52:30; Jeremiah 39:9,11, 40:2, 5.

Nedabiah[edit]

Nedabiah, according to 1 Chronicles 3:18, was one of the sons of king Jeconiah.

Nehum[edit]

See Rehum

Nehushta[edit]

Nehushta was the wife of King Jehoiakim and daughter of Elnathan ben Achbor of Jerusalem, according 2 Kings 24:8. She was also the mother of King Jehoiachin.

Nekoda[edit]

Nekoda was the ancestor of 652 Jews who returned from Babylonia with Ezra, but were declared ineligible to serve as Kohanim (priests) because they could not prove that their ancestors had been Kohanim. This is recounted in Ezra 2:48,60 and in Nehemiah 7:50, 62, where the number of men is given as 642.

Nemuel[edit]

Two men called Nemuel are mentioned in the Bible:

Nepheg[edit]

Two men called Nepheg are mentioned in the Bible:

Nephish[edit]

See Naphish

Ner[edit]

Ner (Hebrew: "Candle") was an uncle of Saul and the father of Abner according to I Samuel 14:50.

Nethaniah[edit]

Nethaniah, son of Asaph, was one of the musicians appointed by David for the musical service of the Temple (1 Chronicles 25:2, 12).

Noadiah[edit]

Noadiah was a false prophetess mentioned in Nehemiah 6:14, one of the antagonists to Nehemiah who sought to discourage him from rebuilding the defensive walls of Jerusalem. Nehemiah calls on God to "remember" her, or in the King James Version, to "think thou upon [her]".[33]

Nobah[edit]

Nobah, of the Tribe of Manasseh defeated the Amorites, took the villages of Kenath and renamed it Nobah according to Numbers 32:42.

Nogah[edit]

Nogah, a son of David, appears in two lists of David's sons: 1 Chronicles 3:7 and 1 Chronicles 14:6.

O[edit]

Obadiah[edit]

Obadiah was a descendant of David, father of Sheconiah, and son of Arnan

Obal[edit]

Obal, also Ebal, was a son of Joktan according to Genesis 10:28, 1 Chronicles 1:22.

Obed[edit]

Obed was the father of Azariah, one of the "commanders of the hundreds" who formed part of Jehoiada's campaign to restore the kingship to Joash in 2 Chronicles 23:1.

Obil[edit]

Obil was an Ishmaelite, a keeper of camels in the time of David, according to 1 Chronicles 27:30.

Ocran[edit]

Ocran was a member of the house of Asher according to Numbers 1:13. He was the father of Pagiel.

On[edit]

On, the son of Peleth, of the Tribe of Reuben, was a participant in Korah's rebellion against Moses according to Numbers 16:1. On is referred to as "Hon" in the Douai Bible translation. He is mentioned alongside Korah, Dathan and Abiram as the instigators of the rebellion, but not referred to later when Korah, Dathan and Abiram were challenged and punished for their rebellion.

Onam[edit]

Onam was the name of 2 biblical figures:

  • Onam one of the sons of Shobal (Genesis 36:23).
  • Onam the son of Jerahmeel and the step-brother of his brothers. His mother was named Atarah (1 Chronicles 2:26).

Ophir[edit]

Ophir was a son of Joktan according to Genesis 10:29, 1 Chronicles 1:23.

Oren[edit]

Oren was a son of Jerahmeel according to 1 Chronicles 2:25.

Ozem[edit]

Two men called Ozem (Hebrew אצם, 'oTsehM, "Urgency") appear in the Bible.

  1. The sixth son of Jesse and thus a brother of David (1 Chronicles 2:15).
  2. A son of Jerahmeel (1 Chronicles 2:25).

Ozni[edit]

See Ezbon.

P[edit]

Pagiel[edit]

Pagiel (Hebrew פַּגְעִיאֵל) was a son of Ocran, a prince of the house of Asher and one of the leaders of the tribes of Israel, according to Numbers 1:13.

Palti[edit]

This is about the Palti mentioned in Numbers. For the other biblical Palti, see Palti, son of Laish.

Palti, the son of Raphu of the house of Benjamin, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:9.

Paltiel[edit]

This is about the Paltiel in the Book of Numbers. For the other Paltiel, see Palti, son of Laish.

Paltiel (Hebrew פַּלְטִיאֵל "delivered by God") was a prince of the tribe of Issachar, one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan among his tribe (Num. 34:26).

Parmashta[edit]

Parmashta appears briefly in Esther 9:9, where he is listed as one of the ten sons of Haman, who is the primary antagonist of the Book of Esther because of his desire to wipe out the Jews.

Parnach[edit]

Parnach was the father of Elizaphan, a prince of the Tribe of Zebulun. (Num. 34:25).

Parosh[edit]

Parosh also called Pharosh, was the name of at least 2 biblical individuals.

Parshandatha[edit]

Parshandatha, also Pharsandatha,[34] was one of the ten sons of Haman. He was killed by a Jew or Jews (the account in the Book of Esther is unclear) and Esther had his corpse impaled (see Esther 9:5–14).

Paruah[edit]

Paruah is mentioned in 1 Kings 4:17 as the father of "Jehoshaphat son of Peruah", a governor governing the territory of the Tribe of Issachar under Solomon.

Paseah[edit]

Paseah is the name of two figures in the Hebrew Bible. In a genealogy of Judah, a Paseah appears (1 Chronicles 4:12) as the son of Eshton, the son of Mehir, the son of Chelub. Another Paseah is mentioned indirectly (Nehemiah 3:6) by way of his son Jehoiada, a repairer of a section of the wall of Jerusalem.

Pedahel[edit]

Pedahel Prince of the tribe of Naphtali; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:28).

Pedahzur[edit]

Pedahzur was a member of the house of Manasseh according to Numbers 1:10. He was the father of Gamaliel.

Pelaiah[edit]

Two men called Pelaiah are mentioned in the Bible. In 1 Chronicles 3:23, a Pelaiah appears in a genealogy. He is listed as one of the sons of Elioenai, the son of Neariah, the son of Shemaiah, the son of Shechaniah. The other Pelaiah appears in Nehemiah (8:7; 10:10) as a Levite who helped to explain biblical law to the inhabitants of Yehud Medinata and signed a document against intermarriage between Jews and non-Jews.

Pelaliah[edit]

Pelaliah (Hebrew Pĕlalyāh) is mentioned in Nehemiah 11:12, which lists a descendant of his as a priestly leader in Jerusalem. The descendant is specified as "Adaiah son of Jeroham son of Pelaliah son of Amzi son of Zechariah son of Pashhur son of Malchiah."

Pelatiah[edit]

Pelatiah (Hebrew: פלטיהו Pelatyahu, meaning "whom Jehovah delivered")[35] the son of Benaiah, a prince of the people (Ezekiel 11:1), was among the 25 men who Ezekiel saw at the East Gate of the temple. He fell dead upon hearing the prophecy regarding Jerusalem (Ezekiel 11:13).

Another Pelatiah appears as being the son of Hananiah the son of Zerubbabel. He is mentioned in 2 passages: 1 Chronicles 3:21 and 1 Chronicles 4:42.

The last Pelatiah is one of the people mentioned in Nehemiah 10:22 who sealed the covenant.

Pelet[edit]

Pelet was one of the sons of Azmaveth, according to 1 Chronicles 12:3, who supported King David at Ziklag.

Peleth[edit]

There are 2 biblical individuals named Peleth

Peresh[edit]

According to 1 Chronicles 7:16, Peresh was the son of Machir, the son of Manasseh.

Pethahiah[edit]

Three men called Pethahiah are named in the Bible.

  1. A levite, mentioned in Nehemiah 10:23 and Nehemiah 9:5.
  2. Pethahiah ben Meshezabel, who was one of the "sons of Zerah" of the Tribe of Judah.
  3. Pethahiah was one of the priest in the temple service ordained by David. (1 Chronicles 24:16)

Pethuel[edit]

Pethuel, the father of Joel, in Joel 1:1.

Peulthai[edit]

Peulthai, according to 1 Chronicles 26:5, was the eighth of Obed-edom's eight sons. The passage in which they are listed records gatekeepers of the temple at Jerusalem.

Phallu[edit]

Phallu or Pallu was a son of Reuben according to Genesis 46:9, Exodus 6:14 and Numbers 26:5. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Phalti[edit]

For the individual called "Phalti" in the King James Bible, see Palti, son of Laish.

Phaltiel[edit]

For the individual called "Paltiel" in the King James Bible, see Palti, son of Laish.

Phurah[edit]

Phurah was a servant of Gideon in Judges 7. Gideon takes Phurah with him to spy on the Midianites before battle.

Phuvah[edit]

Phuvah or Pua was a son of Issachar according to Genesis 46:13 and Numbers 26:23. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Pildash[edit]

Pildash was the son of Nahor and Milcah (Genesis 22:22).

Pinon[edit]

Pinon is listed as one of the "chiefs" of Edom, in Genesis 36:41, and, in a copy of the same list, in 1 Chronicles 1:52.

Piram[edit]

Piram, according to Joshua 10:3, was the king of Jarmuth.

Pochereth-hazzebaim[edit]

Pochereth-hazzebaim was one of Solomon's servants whose descendants returned from the exile with Zerubbabel. (Nehemiah 7:59;Ezra 2:57) He was the head of a family who returned from Babylon. The King James Version has his name modified into Pochereth of Hazzebeim but of was not in 1611 edition of the KJV. In 1 Esdras 5:34 he is called Phacareth.

Poratha[edit]

Poratha, according to Esther 9:8, was one of the ten sons of Haman, the antagonist of the Book of Esther who attempted to wipe out the Jewish people.

Pul[edit]

Pul was an abbreviation for the Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III. Pul attacked Israel in the reign of Menahem and extracted tribute. II Kings 15:19

Putiel[edit]

Putiel was the father of Eleazar's wife according to Exodus 6:25. According to Rashi this was another name of Jethro.

Q[edit]

Qedar[edit]

Qedar (Kedar): see Qedarites: Biblical

R[edit]

Raamiah[edit]

Raamiah (Hebrew רַעַמְיָה) is one of the princes who returned from the Exile (Neh. 7:7). He is also called Reelaiah in Ezra 2:2.

Rabmag[edit]

Rabmag (Hebrew רַב־מָג, from Assyrian "Rab-mugi") was a "chief physician" attached to the king of Babylon (Jeremiah 39:3,13).

Raddai[edit]

Raddai, according to 1 Chronicles 2:14, was one of the brother of King David.

Rakem[edit]

See Rekem.

Ramiah[edit]

Ramiah, according to Ezra 10:25, was an Israelite layperson, a member of the group named "sons of Parosh", who was guilty of marrying a foreign woman.

Rapha[edit]

Rapha, according to the Septuagint version of 2 Samuel 21:16, was the parent of Jesbi, the name in that version for the giant referred to in the Massoretic text as Ishbi-benob.[36] In the Latin Vulgate, he is referred to as Arapha or Arafa.[37]

Raphu[edit]

Raphu of the house of Benjamin was the father of Palti, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:9.

Rechab[edit]

Rechab (Hebrew: רֵכָב Rēḵāḇ) is the name of three men in the Bible:

  • One of the two "captains of bands" whom Saul's son Ish-bosheth took into his service, and who conspired to kill him. (2 Samuel 4:2)
  • A Kenite, mentioned as the father of Jehonadab at King Jehu's time, from whom the tribe of the Rechabites derived their name.[38] Jehonadab and his people had all along become worshippers of God.
  • The father of Malchiah, ruler of part of Beth-haccerem. (Nehemiah 3:14)

Regem[edit]

Regem is named in 1 Chronicles 2:47 as one of the sons of Jahdai, a figure who appears in a genealogy associated with Caleb.

Regem-melech[edit]

A figure called Regem-melech, along with a "Sharezer", came, according to some interpretations of Zechariah 7:2, to Bethel to ask a question about fasts. It is unclear whether the name is intended as a title or as a proper name.[39] The grammar of the verse is difficult and several interpretations have been proposed.[40]

Rehabiah[edit]

Rehabiah is a figure mentioned three times in the Hebrew Bible, as the ancestor of a group of Levites. He is identified as the son of Eliezer the son of Moses (1 Chronicles 23:17; 26:25). Chronicles identifies him as the father of a person named Isshiah (Hebrew Yiššiyāh, 1 Chronicles 24:21) or Jeshaiah (Hebrew Yĕshaʿyāhû, 1 Chronicles 26:25).

Rehob[edit]

Rehob (Hebrew: רחב which can be translated into Rahab) was the name of 2 biblical figures:

Rehum[edit]

Rehum refers to four or five biblical figures.[41]

  1. A Rehum is mentioned in Ezra 2:2, who is called Nehum in Nehemiah 7:7. He appears in passing, in two copies of a list of people said to have come from Persia to Yehud Medinata under the leadership of Nehemiah. He may be the same individual mentioned in Nehemiah 12:3.
  2. A Rehum is mentioned in Nehemiah 12:3, where he is listed as part of a group of priests associated with Zerubbabel.
  3. Rehum son of Bani, a Levite, appears in a list of people who contributed to building Nehemiah's wall in Nehemiah 3:17.
  4. Rehum, a member of a group of priests associated with Zerubbabel according to Nehemiah 12:3.
  5. Rehum was an official, according to Ezra 4:8–23, who along with collaborators opposed the Jewish attempt to rebuild Jerusalem.

Rephaiah[edit]

Rephaiah is the name of 3 biblical figures:

  • Rephaiah (Hebrew רְפָיָה "the Lord has healed"), a descendant of David was the father of Arnan and the son of Jeshaiah.
  • Rephaiah the son of Hur the ruler of the half part of Jerusalem according to the Book of Nehemiah.
  • Rephaiah the son of Binea and the father of Eleasah, also called Rapha.

Reba[edit]

Reba was one of five Midianite kings killed during the time of Moses by an Israelite expedition led by Phinehas, son of Eleazar according to Numbers 31:8 and Joshua 13:21.

Rekem[edit]

This is about individuals in the Bible named Rekem. For the city by that name, see List of minor biblical places § Rekem.

Rekem (Hebrew רֶקֶם) refers to more than one individual in the Hebrew Bible:

  • Rekem was one of five Midianite kings killed during the time of Moses by an Israelite expedition led by Phinehas, son of Eleazar according to Numbers 31:8 and Joshua 13:21. Josephus identifies Rekem with the king who built Petra, a city later associated with the Nabateans.[42] He indicates that in his time the local population still called it Rekem after this founder, and in fact, according to modern scholarship the Nabateans themselves referred to it by this name RQM (רקם)[43] in the Aramaic alphabet they used, spelled identically as the Biblical name.
  • According to 1 Chronicles 2:43–44, Hebron, a figure associated with the biblical Caleb, was the father of a person named Rekem.
  • According to 1 Chronicles 7:16, Machir the son of Manasseh was the ancestor of a figure named Rekem. In this last passage, the King James Version spells the name as Rakem.

Rephael[edit]

In 1 Chronicles 26:7–8, Rephael (Hebrew: רְפָאֵל, Modern: Refaʾel, Tiberian: Rəp̄āʾēl, "healed of God") was one of Shemaiah's sons. He and his brethren, on account of their "strength for service," formed one of the divisions of the temple porters.

Reumah[edit]

Reumah, according to Genesis 22:24, was the concubine of Abraham's brother Nahor, and the mother of his children Tebah, Gaham, Tahash, and Maachah.

Rezon[edit]

According to I Kings 11:23– Rezon (Hebrew: רזון Rezon) became regent in Damascus and was an adversary of Solomon.

Ribai[edit]

Ribai, a Benjamite of Gibeah, was the father of Ittai, one of King David's Warriors (2 Samuel 23:29, 1 Chronicles 11:31).

Rinnah[edit]

Rinnah appears once in the Bible, as the son of a man named Shimon (1 Chronicles 4:20) in a genealogy of Tribe of Judah. Neither Shimon's origin nor precise relationship to Judah is given.

Rohgah[edit]

In 1 Chronicles 7, Rohgah, also spelled Rohagah, was one of the sons of Shamer (the vocalization found in v. 34) or Shomer (the vocalization found in v. 32), who is identified as the son of Heber, the son of Beriah, the son of the tribal patriarch Asher.

Romamti-ezer[edit]

Romamti-ezer appears twice in the Hebrew Bible, both times in 1 Chronicles 25. In verse 4 he is identified as one of the fourteen sons of Heman, one of three men who according to Chronicles were assigned to be in charge of musical worship in the Temple of Jerusalem. Later in the chapter, 288 assigned to the musical service are divided into twenty-four groups of twelve. The twenty-fourth group is assigned to Romamti-ezer (verse 31).

Rosh[edit]

Hebrew: ראש rosh "Head"

Rosh is the seventh of the ten sons of Benjamin named in Genesis 46:21.

A nation named Rosh is also possibly mentioned in Ezekiel 38:2–3, 39:1 "Son of man, set your face toward Gog, the land of Magog, the prince of Rosh, Meshech, and Tubal; and prophesy concerning him."

This translation "Rosh" is found in NASB but not in KJV and most modern versions. Also in a variant reading of Isaiah 66:19 (MT) and the Septuagint Jeremiah 32:23.[citation needed] Many scholars categorize this as a mistranslation of נְשִׂ֕יא רֹ֖אשׁ, nesi ro'š ("chief prince"), rather than a toponym[citation needed].

However, the three oldest translations of the Old Testament (The Septuagint, Theodotion and Symmachus) all transliterate the word "rosh" into the Greek in Ezekiel 38 and 39, thus treating it as a proper noun and suggesting they viewed this word as a toponym. Significantly, these same translations choose to translate and not transliterate the same Hebrew word into its Greek interpretations in other chapters (e.g. Ezekiel 40:1).

S[edit]

Sabtah[edit]

Sabtah (סַבְתָּ֥ה) was a son of Cush according to Genesis 10:7, 1 Chronicles 1:9.

Sabtechah[edit]

Sabtechah (סַבְתְּכָ֑א) was a son of Cush according to Genesis 10:7, 1 Chronicles 1:9.

Sachar[edit]

Two men called Sachar (sometimes spelled Sacar or Sakar) are mentioned in the Bible:

Sachia[edit]

Sachia (also Sakia) appears only in 1 Chronicles 8:10, where he is listed as one of the "sons" of Shaharaim. The King James Version spells the name Shachia.

Salu[edit]

Salu, of the house of Simeon, was the father of Zimri who was involved in the Heresy of Peor according to Numbers 25:14.

Saph[edit]

Saph is a figure briefly mentioned in a section of 2 Samuel which discusses four yelide haraphah killed by Israelites. According to 2 Samuel 21:18, a war broke out between Israel and the Philistines. During the battle, Sibbecai the Hushathite, one of David's Mighty Warriors, killed Saph, who was one of the four. The expression yelide haraphah is rendered several different ways in translations of the Bible: "the descendants of Rapha" (NIV, NLT), "the descendants of the giants" (ESV, NLT[44]), "the descendants of the giant" (NASB, Holman), and "the sons of the giant" (KJV, ASV). While most interpreters the phrase as a statement about the ancestry of the four people killed, describing them as descended from giants, another interpretation takes the phrase as meaning "votaries of Rapha," in reference to a deity by that name to which a group of warriors would have been associated.[45][46]

Saraph[edit]

Saraph (Hebrew: שראף) was a descendant of Shelah, son of Judah. (1 Chronicles 4:21-23)

Sarsekim[edit]

Sarsekim, also spelled Sarsechim, is a name or title, or a portion of a name or title, which appears in Jeremiah 39:3. Jeremiah describes Babylonian officials, some named and the rest unnamed, who according to the text sat down "in the middle gate" of Jerusalem during its destruction in 587 or 586 BCE. The portion which explicitly gives the names and/or titles of the officials reads, in Hebrew, nrgl śr ʾṣr smgr nbw śr skym rb srys nrgl śr ʾṣr rb-mg. Various interpretations have divided the names in various ways. The King James Version, sticking closely to the grammatical indicators added to the text by the Masoretes during the Middle Ages, reads this as indicating six figures: "Nergalsharezer, Samgarnebo, Sarsechim, Rabsaris, Nergalsharezer, Rabmag". The New International Version sees three characters "Nergal-Sharezer of Samgar, Nebo-Sarsekim a chief officer, Nergal-Sharezer a high official." Versions featuring these three figures, with variations in the exact details of translations, include NLT and ESV. Four figures appear in the New American Standard Bible, "Nergal-sar-ezer, Samgar-nebu, Sar-sekim the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag."

In 2007, a Babylonian Tablet was deciphered containing a reference to a "Nabu-sharussu-ukin," identified as referring to the biblical figure.[47] See Nebo-Sarsekim Tablet.

Seba[edit]

Seba was a son of Cush according to Genesis 10:7, 1 Chronicles 1:9 The "tall men of Seba" (Good News Bible) are also referred to in Isaiah 45:14

Segub[edit]

There are two biblical individuals called Segub mentioned in the Bible.

  • The youngest son of Hiel the Beth-elite who rebuilt Jericho after 700 years of the Israelites destroying is mentioned in 1 Kings 16:34.
  • One of the sons of Hezron through the daughter of Machir the son of Manasseh. He was also the father Jair and could possibly be Jair the judge of Israel, Segub also controlled twenty-three cities in Gilead. He is mentioned briefly in 1 Chronicles 2:21–22.

Seled[edit]

According to 1 Chronicles 2:1–30, in the genealogical section which begins the book of Chronicles, Seled, who died childless, was the brother of Appaim and son of Nadab, the son of Shammai, the son of Onam, the son of Jerahmeel, the son of Hezron, the son of Perez, the son of Judah, the eponymous founder of the Tribe of Judah.

Semachiah[edit]

Semachiah (or Semakiah) appears in 1 Chronicles 26:7, in a genealogical passage concerning gatekeepers of the Jerusalem Temple. Semachiah is described as a son of Shemaiah, a son of Obed-Edom.

Sered[edit]

Sered was a son of Zebulun according to Genesis 46:14 and Numbers 26:26. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob. According to the verse in Numbers, he was the eponymous forefather of the clan of Sardites.

Sethur[edit]

Sethur, the son of Michael of the house of Asher, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:13.

Shaaph[edit]

Shaaph appears in the second chapter of 1 Chronicles. In one translation, these verses read as follows: "And the sons of Jahdai: Regem, and Jotham, and Geshan, and Pelet, and Ephah, and Shaaph. Maacah, Caleb's concubine, bore Sheber and Tirhanah. And [the wife of] Shaaph the father of Madmannah bore Sheva the father of Machbenah and the father of Gibea. And the daughter of Caleb was Achsah" (1 Chronicles 2:47–49).

The words [the wife of] do not occur in the Hebrew text, which reads literally, as Sara Japhet translates it, "And Shaaph the father of Madmannah bore Sheva . . ." but with a feminine form (watteled) of the verb "bore," rather than the expected masculine form wayyoled.[48] Japhet outlines several possibilities as to how the text may originally have read.[48]

Shaashgaz[edit]

Shaashgaz appears in the Hebrew Bible in Esther 2:14, where it is given as the name of the eunuch who was in charge of the "second house of the women".

Shabbethai[edit]

Shabbethai, a Levite who helped Ezra in the matter of the foreign marriages (Ezra 10:15), probably the one present at Ezra's reading of the law (Nehemiah 8:7), and possibly the Levite chief and overseer (Nehemiah 11:16). The name might mean "one born on Sabbath", but more probably is a modification of the ethnic Zephathi (Zephathite), from Zarephathi (Zarephathite). Meshullam and Jozabad, with which Shabbethai's name is combined, both originate in ethnic names. (Encyclopaedia Biblica)

Shagee[edit]

Shagee (also spelled Shage or Shageh) is a figure who appears, indirectly, in one version of the list of David's Mighty Warriors.

In 1 Chronicles 11:34, a figure appears who is called "Jonathan the son of Shagee the Hararite." In 2 Samuel 23:32–33, the name "Jonathan" appears directly before the name "Shammah the Harodite", while in 2 Samuel 23:11 is found "Shammah the son of Agee the Hararite," who is the subject of a very brief story in which he fights with Philistines. The exact sort of copying error or deliberate abbreviation that may have led to this state of affairs is uncertain.[49]

Shaharaim[edit]

Shaharaim was a member of the house of Benjamin. He had three wives, Hushim, Baara, and Hodesh, according to 1 Chronicles 8:8–9.

Shamed[edit]

See Shemed.

Shamhuth[edit]

Shamhuth the Izrahite (Hebrew, Shamhut ha-Yizrah) is a figure mentioned in the list of military divisional captains in 1 Chronicles 27:8. The 27th chapter of 1 Chronicles gives the names of people who, according to the Chronicler, were in charge of 24,000-man divisions of David's military, each of which was on active duty for a month. Shamhuth was the commander for the fifth month of each year. Other Izrahites were mentioned in 1 Chronicles 26:29 in connection with duties outside Jerusalem.

Shamir[edit]

This is about the individual named Shamir. For the biblical place-name Shamir, see List of minor biblical places § Shamir.

Shamir appears in a list of Levite names (1 Chronicles 24:24).

Shammah[edit]

See Shammah for several people by this name.

Shammai[edit]

Shammai (Hebrew: שִׁמִּי) was the name of at least 3 biblical individuals.

  • One of the sons of Onam according to 1 Chronicles 2:28, he also had two sons: Nadab and Abishur, he was also the brother of Jada.
  • A son of Rekem and the father of Maon, and a Jerahmeelite. (1 Chronicles 2:44–45)
  • One of the children of Ezra in 1 Chronicles 4:17. He was also probably the same person as Shimon (q.v) ver. 20. The Septuagint suggest that Jether was the father of all three. Rabbi D. Kimchi speculates that the children in 1 Chronicles 4:17 were the children of Mered by his wife Bithiah, the daughter of Pharaoh.[50]

Shammoth[edit]

According to 1 Chronicles 11:27, Shammoth the Harorite was one of David's Mighty Warriors. An entry in the corresponding list in Samuel contains Shammah the Harodite (2 Samuel 23:25). See Shammah.

Shammua[edit]

There are four individuals by the name of Shammua in the Hebrew Bible:[51]

  • Shammua, the son of Zaccur of the house of Reuben, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:4.
  • One of David's sons, mentioned in 2 Samuel 5:14 and 1 Chronicles 14:4.
  • A Levite in the time of Nehemiah (11:17).
  • A Levite in the time of Nehemiah (12:18).

Shamsherai[edit]

Shamsherai is mentioned once, in passing, in a long list of the "sons of Elpaal" within a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:26).

Shapham[edit]

A figure named Shapham is mentioned in passing once in the Hebrew Bible, in a list of Gadites (1 Chronicles 5:12).

Shaphat[edit]

Shaphat, the son of Hori of the house of Simeon, was a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:5.

Also the name of one of King David's sons by Bathsheba.

Sharai[edit]

A Sharai is mentioned once in the Bible, in passing, in a list of the "sons of Bani" (Ezra 10:40).

Sharar[edit]

A Sharar is mentioned indirectly in 2 Samuel 23:33, where "Ahiam the son of Sharar the Hararite" is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors. In 1 Chronicles 11:35, the same figure is referred to as Sacar (sometimes spelled Sakar or Sachar).

Sharezer[edit]

Sharezer, according to 2 Kings 19:37 and Isaiah 37:38, was one of the two sons of Sennacherib. He and his brother Adrammelech killed their father as he worshipped in the temple of Nisroch.

Shashai[edit]

A Shashai is listed in the Book of Ezra as a man who married a foreign wife (Ezra 10:40).

Shashak[edit]

Shashak or Sashak was a member of Benjamin's dynasty, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 8:14 and 25.

Sheariah[edit]

Sheariah, according to 1 Chronicles 8, was a descendant of King Saul, specifically one of the six sons of Azel (1 Chronicles 8:38), the son of Eleasah, the son of Raphah, the son of Binea, the son of Moza (v. 37), the son of Zimri, the son of Jehoaddah, the son of Ahaz (36), the son of Micah (35), the son of Merib-baal, the son of Jonathan (34), the son of Saul (33). He is also mentioned 1 Chronicles 9, which substantially repeats the same genealogy, except that chapter 9 reads Rephaiah instead of Raphah (v. 43) and Jadah instead of Jehoaddah (42).

Shearjashub[edit]

Shearjashub (שאר ישובŠə'ār-yāšūḇ) is possibly[clarification needed] the first-mentioned son of Isaiah according to Isaiah 7:3. His name means "the remnant shall return" and was prophetic, offering hope to the people of Israel that although they were going to be sent into exile, and their temple destroyed, God remained faithful and would deliver "a remnant" from Babylon and bring them back to their land.

However, Targum Pseudo-Jonathan, Rashi, and some modern translations interpret the phrase according to the Masoretic grammar of the Hebrew cantillation marks, which break the sentence into "u-sh'ar, yashuv b'nekha," "And the remnant, of your sons which will return," viz. a phrase and not a proper noun. Pseudo-Jonathan reads "and the rest of thy disciples, who have not sinned, and who are turned away from sin," and Rashi, "The small remnant that will return to Me through you, and they are like your sons." The Brenton Septuagint Translation and Douay–Rheims Bible translate the phrase "and thy son Jasub who is left," following the Masoretic grammar but assuming that "Jasub," "will return," is still a proper noun.

Sheconiah[edit]

Sheconiah was a descendant of David, father of Shemaiah, and son of Obadiah.

Shechem[edit]

Shechem was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

Shedeur[edit]

Shedeur was a member of the house of Reuben according to Numbers 1:5. He was the father of Elizur.

Shelemiah[edit]

Shelemiah (Hebrew: שלמיהו) the son of Abdeel, along with two others, was commanded by king Jehoiakim to arrest Baruch the scribe and Jeremiah the prophet (Jeremiah 36:25).

Shelomi[edit]

Shelomi was the father of Ahihud, a prince of the Tribe of Asher. (Num. 34:27).

Shelumiel[edit]

Shelumiel (Hebrew: שלמיאל) was a son of Zurishaddai, a prince of the tribe of Simeon and one of the leaders of the tribes of Israel, according to Numbers 1:6. Yiddish schlemiel, a term for a "hapless loser", is said to be derived from the name.[52]

Shelomith[edit]

Shelomith was the name of 5 biblical individuals in the Hebrew Bible.

  • A daughter of Dibri of the house of Dan, according to Leviticus 24:11. She was married to an Egyptian and her son (unnamed) was stoned to death by the people of Israel for blasphemy, following Moses' issue of a ruling[53] on the penalty to be applied for blasphemy.
  • A daughter of Zerubbabel during the exile. (1 Chronicles 3:19)
  • A Levite and a chief of the sons of Izhar in the time of David's death. (1 Chronicles 23:18) Also called Shelomoth. (1 Chronicles 24:22–23)
  • The youngest child of Rehoboam through Maachah. It is uncertain whether they were a son or daughter. (2 Chronicles 11:20)
  • Shelomith, with the son of Josiphiah returned from Babylon with Ezra with 80 male individuals. There appears, however, to be an omission, which may be supplied from the Sept., and the true reading is probably "Of the sons of Bani, Shelomith the son of Josiphiah." See also 1 Esdr. 8:36, where he is called "Assamoth son of Josaphias." See Keil, ad oc.[54]

Shelomoth[edit]

Shelomoth was the name of 2 biblical individuals.

Shemaiah[edit]

See List of people in the Hebrew Bible called Shemaiah

Shemariah[edit]

Shemariah is the name of four biblical figures.

In 1 Chronicles 12:5, Shemariah is a Benjamite, one of David's soldiers.

In 2 Chronicles 11:19, Shemariah is one of the sons of Rehoboam, spelled Shamariah in the King James Version.

In Ezra 10:32, Shemariah is one of the "sons of Harim," in a list of men who took foreign wives. Another Shemariah, one of the "descendants of Bani", appears in verse 41.

Shemeber[edit]

Shemeber is the king of Zeboiim in Genesis 14 who joins other Canaanite city kings in rebelling against Chedorlaomer.

Shemed[edit]

Shemed, spelled Shamed in the King James Version, is a figure briefly listed in 1 Chronicles 8:12 as one of the sons of Elpaal, the son of Shaharaim. He and his two brothers are referred to as "Eber, and Misham, and Shamed, who built Ono, and Lod, with the towns thereof" (1 Chronicles 8:12).

Shemer[edit]

Shemer (Hebrew: שמר Shemer "guardian") is the name of three biblical figures.

According to Kings, Shemer was the name of the man from whom Omri, King of Israel, bought Samaria (Hebrew Shomron), which he named after Shemer.[55]

According to 1 Chronicles, one of the Levites involved in the musical ministry of the Jerusalem temple was "Ethan the son of Kishi, the son of Abdi, the son of Malluch, the son of Hashabiah, the son of Amaziah, the son of Hilkiah, the son of Amzi, the son of Bani, the son of Shemer, the son of Mahli, the son of Mushi, the son of Merari, the son of Levi" (1 Chronicles 6:44–47). In this passage, the King James Version spells the name Shamer.

1 Chronicles 7:34 mentions a Shemer as one of the descendants of the Tribe of Asher. In verse 32, this figure is called Shomer, and is the son of Heber, the son of Beriah, the son of Asher.

Shemida[edit]

Shemida was a son of Manasseh according to Numbers 26:32, Joshua 17:2, and 1 Chronicles 7:19.

Shemiramoth[edit]

Shemiramoth was the name of 2 biblical individuals.

Shemuel[edit]

Shemuel Prince of the tribe of Simeon; one of those appointed by Moses to superintend the division of Canaan amongst the tribe (Num. 34:20).

Shenazar[edit]

Shenazar (Hebrew שֵׁנאִצִּר fiery tooth or splendid leader) was one of the six sons of King Jehoiachin during the time of the exile according to 1 Chronicles 3:18.

Shephatiah[edit]

Shephatiah (Hebrew שפטיה) is the name of at least nine Hebrew Bible men:

Shepho[edit]

Shepho is one of the sons of Shobal according to (Genesis 36:23).

Sheshai[edit]

Sheshai was one of the descendants of Anak mentioned in Numbers 13:22. When the Israelites took possession of the land, Sheshai along with Talmai and Ahiman were driven out of the land. (Joshua 15:14; Judges 1:10)

Sheshan[edit]

Sheshan is the name of one, or possibly two, biblical characters mentioned in the first book of Chronicles:

  • "The son of Ishi was Sheshan, and Sheshan's daughter was Ahlai ... Now Sheshan had no sons, only daughters. And Sheshan had an Egyptian servant whose name was Jarha. Sheshan gave his daughter to Jarha his servant as wife, and they had a child, Attai."[56]

Shillem[edit]

Shillem was a son of Naphtali according to Genesis 46:24 and Numbers 26:49. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Shimea[edit]

Shimea, according to bible's account, was the name of 2 biblical individuals.

  • A Merarite as the son of Uzziah, and also the father of Haggish. (1 Chronicles 6:30)
  • The grandfather of Asaph the prophet or seer of the men who ministered with music before the tabernacle, the tent of meeting. He is the father of Asaph's father Berechiah. (1 Chronicles 6:39)

Shimeah[edit]

The name Shimeah is used for two figures in the Hebrew Bible.

  • Shimeah or Shammah was a third son of Jesse, a brother of David (1 Samuel 16:9), and the father of Jonadab (2 Samuel 13:3).
  • A figure named Mikloth is the father of Shimeah according to 1 Chronicles 8:32, which gives no further information about either of them but places them in a genealogy of the Tribe of Benjamin. In a parallel passage, 1 Chronicles 9:38 calls this son of Mikloth Shimeam, and presents Mikloth as a son of "Jehiel the father of Gibeon," making Mikloth a great-uncle of the Israelite king Saul.

Shimei[edit]

Shimei (Hebrew: שִׁמְעִי Šīmʿī) is the name of a number of persons referenced in the Hebrew Bible and Rabbinical literature.

Shimi[edit]

Shimrath[edit]

Shimrath was a Benjaminite, as one of the nine sons of Shimei. (1 Chronicles 8:21)

Shimri[edit]

The name Shimri appears 3 times in the Hebrew Bible

Shimron[edit]

Shimron was a son of Issachar according to Genesis 46:13, Numbers 26:24 and 1 Chronicles 7:1. He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Shimshai[edit]

Shimshai was a scribe who was represented the peoples listed in Ezra 4:9–10 in a letter to King Artaxerxes.

Shinab[edit]

Shinab is the king of Admah in Genesis 14 who joins other Canaanite city kings in rebelling against Chedorlaomer.

Shiphi[edit]

Shiphi was the son of Allon and the father of Ziza mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:37.

Shiphtan[edit]

Shiphtan was the father of Kemuel, a prince of the Tribe of Ephraim. (Num. 34:24).

Shisha[edit]

Shisha (Hebrew – שישא) was the father of Elihoreph and Ahijah, who were scribes of King Solomon (1 Kings 4:3).

Shobab[edit]

Shobab שובב "Mischievous" is the name of two figures in the Hebrew Bible.

  • Shobab was one of the children born to King David after he took up residence in Jerusalem (2 Samuel 5:14), whose mother is named in 1 Chronicles 3:5 as Bathshua or Bathsheba, the daughter of Ammiel.[59] In Brenton's Septuagint Translation, his name is translated as "Sobab" and his mother's name is given as "Bersabee".[60] Each reference to him mentions him briefly, in a list along with at least three other sons of David born in Jerusalem (2 Samuel 5:14; 1 Chronicles 3:5, 14:4).
  • Shobab is mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:18 as one of the children of Caleb, son of Hezron (not to be confused with the more famous Caleb son of Jephunneh).

Shobal[edit]

Shobal was a Horite chief in the hill country of Seir during the days of Esau. He was a son of Seir the Horite, and his sons were Alvas, Manahath, Ebal, Shepho and Onam. He is mentioned in Genesis 36:20–29.

Shuni[edit]

Shuni was a son of Gad according to Genesis 46:16 and Numbers 26:15. He was one of the 70 persons to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Shuthelah[edit]

Shuthelah (Hebrew: שׁוּתֶלַח, romanized: /ˌʃˈtæˌlɑːx/ shoo-TELL-ahkh) was a son of Ephraim and father of Eran, according to Numbers 26:35 and 1 Chronicles 7:20.[citation needed]

Sisamai[edit]

Sisamai was the son of Eleasah and the father of Shallum mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:40.

Sodi[edit]

Sodi of the house of Zebulun was the father of Gaddiel, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:10.

Sotai[edit]

Sotai was a descendant of the servants of Solomon, and his own descendants were listed among those who returned from the Babylonian exile in Ezra 2:55.

Susi[edit]

Susi of the house of Manasseh was the father of Gaddi, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:11.

T[edit]

Tahan[edit]

Tahan was a son of Ephraim according to Numbers 26:35 and 1 Chronicles 7:25.

Tahash[edit]

Tahash was one of the sons of Nahor and his concubine Reumah, he is only mentioned in one verse in the Bible which is Genesis 22:24.

Tahath[edit]

There are 3 people named Tahath in the Hebrew Bible.

Taphath[edit]

Taphath (Hebrew טפת, "Drop") was a daughter of Solomon and wife of one of her father's twelve regional administrators, the son of Abinadab (First Kings 4:11).

Tappuah[edit]

Tappuah, one of the four sons of Hebron. Mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:43.

Tebah[edit]

Tebah (Hebrew: טבח, "Massacre") was a son of Nahor, son of Terah and his concubine Reumah. He is mentioned in Genesis 22:24.

Tekoa[edit]

Tekoa or Tekoah (Hebrew: תְּקוֹעַ, Modern: Teku'a, Tiberian: Tekû'a) was the son of Ashhur the son of Hezron through an unnamed mother mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:24, 4:5. The name Tekoah[61][62][63][64] is also the name of a place which the Prophet Amos was born.[65]

Temeni[edit]

Temeni is described in the Bible as a son of Naarah and Ashhur the son of Hezron the Grandson of Judah the founder of the tribe. He was the brother of Haahashtari, Ahuzam, and Hepher according to 1 Chronicles 4:6.

Tirhanah[edit]

Tirhanah according to the Biblical Narrative was the son of Caleb the son of Hezron. He was the son of Caleb's concubine named Maachah, and also the brother of Shaaph and Sheber. (1 Chronicles 2:48)

Tola[edit]

Tola (Hebrew: תּוֹלָע, Modern: Tola', Tiberian: Tôlā') was the name of two individuals mentioned in the Bible:

U[edit]

Uel[edit]

In Ezra 10:34 : "Of the sons of Bani; Maadai, Amram, and Uel."

Ulam[edit]

Ulam is a name that appears twice in the Hebrew Bible. In 1 Chronicles 7:16–17, an Ulam appears in a genealogical passage as the son of Peresh, the son of Machir, the son of the patriarch Manasseh. In 1 Chronicles 8:39, an Ulam appears in a genealogy as the son of Eshek, the brother of Azel, the son of Eleasah, the son of Raphah, the son of Binea, the son of Moza, the son of Zimri, the son of Jehoadah, the son of Ahaz, the son of Micah, the son of Meribbaal.

Uri[edit]

Uri is mentioned 7 times, 6 of which indicate that another figure is the "son of Uri". The meaning of the name in English is "my light", "my flame" or "illumination".

  • Uri (Hebrew: אוּרִי) is mentioned in Exodus 31 and 1 Chronicles 2 as a member of the Tribe of Judah. He is the son of Hur (Hebrew: חור) and the father of Bezalel (Hebrew: בצלאל).
  • Another Uri (Hebrew: אוּרִי) is mentioned in Ezra 10 as one of those who have taken "strange wives."

Uriel[edit]

Urijah son of Shemaiah[edit]

Urijah, son of Shemaiah (Hebrew: אוּרִיָּהוּ בֵּנ–שְׁמַעְיָהוּ ʾŪrīyyāhū ben-Šəmaʿyāhū) was a minor prophet mentioned in Jeremiah 26:20-23. He was from Kiriath-Jearim, and his prophecies often matched Jeremiah's criticisms. When Jehoiakim heard the reports of these prophecies, he sent to have him killed, but Urijah fled to Egypt. In response, Jehoiakim sent a group of men, including Elnathan son of Achbor – the future father-in-law to his son, Jeconiah – to bring him back. After being brought before the king, he was executed, and buried in a potter's field.

Urijah[edit]

Urijah (Hebrew: אוריה uriyah) a priest in the time of King Ahaz of Judah, built an altar at the temple in Jerusalem on the Damascene model for Tiglathpileser, king of Assyria. II Kings 16:10–16

Uz[edit]

Uz was the name of 3 biblical characters in the Bible:

V[edit]

Vaizatha[edit]

Vaizatha (or Vajezatha; Hebrew: וַיְזָתָא) is one of the ten sons of Persian vizier Haman, mentioned in Esther 9:9. Haman had planned to kill all the Jews living under the reign of King Ahasuerus, but his plot was foiled. In their defence, the Jews killed 500 men in the citadel of Susa, as well as Vaizatha and his nine brothers: this event is remembered in the Jewish festival Purim. Walther Hinz has proposed that the name is a rendering of an Old Iranian name, Vahyazzāta, which itself is derived from Vahyaz-dāta ("given from the best one"), as found in Aramaic, Elamite, and Akkadian sources.[66]

Vaniah[edit]

Vaniah, meaning nourishment, or weapons, of the Lord; one of many sons of Bani named in Ezra 10:36.

Vophsi[edit]

Vophsi of the house of Naphtali was the father of Nahbi, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:14.

Z[edit]

Zaavan[edit]

Zaavan (za'-a-van or za'-awan), son of Ezer, was a Horite chief in the Land of Edom. (Gen. 36:27, 1 Chr. 1:42)

Zabad[edit]

Zabad is the name of seven men in the Hebrew Bible.

Zabbai[edit]

Zabbai was the father of Baruch, one of Nehemiah's helpers in repairing the walls of Jerusalem, according to Nehemiah 3:20.

Zabdi[edit]

Zabdi, son of Zerah, of the Tribe of Judah, was the father of Carmi and the grandfather of Achan, according to Joshua 7:1. He was present at the Battle of Jericho.

Zabud[edit]

Zabud (Hebrew – זבוד, zābud, meaning "endowed."[67]) was a priest and friend of King Solomon, according to 1 Kings 4:5. He is described as the "son of Nathan," but it is unclear whether this is Nathan the prophet or Nathan the son of David.[68] As a "friend" of the king, he probably served the function of a counselor.[68]

Zaccur[edit]

Zaccur of the house of Reuben was the father of Shammua, a scout sent to Canaan prior to the crossing of the Jordan River according to Numbers 13:4.

Zalmon[edit]

Zalmon the Ahohite, according to 2 Samuel 23:28 in the Masoretic Text, is listed as one of David's Mighty Warriors. In the Masoretic Text of 1 Chronicles 11:29, in another copy of the same list of warriors, he is called "Ilai the Ahohite."[69] Where the Masoretic Text has "Zalmon," various manuscripts of the Greek Septuagint have Ellon, Sellom, or Eliman.[69] And where the Masoretic Text has "Ilai," the Septuagint reads Elei, Eli, or Ela.[69]

Zaza[edit]

Zaza was one of the sons of Jonathan mentioned in (1 Chronicles 2:33); he was also the brother of Peleth and the grandson of Jada.

Zebadiah[edit]

Zebadiah (cf. Zebedee) may refer to:

Zebudah[edit]

Zebudah was the first wife of King Josiah; they had a son, Jehoiakim. She is mentioned in these passages: 2 Kings 23:36. She was the daughter of Pedaiah of Rumah.

Zechariah[edit]

Zechariah was the name of 18 minor biblical individuals.

In addition to the characters named above, there are numerous minor characters in the Bible with the same name:

Zedekiah[edit]

(Hebrew צִדְקִיָּה tsidqiyah)[70]

  • Zedekiah, King of Judah
  • Zedekiah, son of Chenaanah, a false prophet in the time of Kings Jehoshaphat and Ahab[71]
  • Zedekiah, son of Maaseiah, who, according to Jeremiah 29:21, was a false prophet.[72]
  • Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, one of the princes to whom Michaiah told of Jeremiah's prophecy – Jeremiah 36:12
  • Zedekiah the son of King Jehoiachin according to 1 Chronicles 3:16. Not to be confused with his granduncle King Zedekiah.

Zephaniah[edit]

Zephaniah (Hebrew צפניה, pronounced TsePhNiYaH) was the name of at least three people in the Bible:

  • Zephaniah the prophet (q.v.)
  • Zephaniah the son of Maaseiah the priest in Jeremiah 29:25. A member of the deputation sent by King Zedekiah to Jeremiah (Jeremiah 21:1; 37:3). "He is probably the same Zephaniah who is called 'the second priest' in 52:24 ... and was among those executed after the capture of Jerusalem in 587 B.C. In the present situation he is overseer of the temple (vs. 26), occupying the position which had been held earlier by Pashur, who had put Jeremiah in stocks..."[73]
  • Zephaniah also called Uriel which was the son of Tahath and the father of Uzziah or Azariah according to 1 Chronicles 6:24

Zephon[edit]

See Ziphion.

Zerah[edit]

See Zohar.

Zerahiah[edit]

Zerahiah was a High Priest and an ancestor of Zadok, he was the son of Uzzi and the father of Meraioth. He is mentioned in (1 Chronicles 6:6, 1 Chronicles 6:51; Ezra 7:4)

Zeri[edit]

See Izri.

Zeror[edit]

Zeror, son of Bechorath, of the tribe of Benjamin, was the great-grandfather of King Saul and of his commander Abner. According to Saul, his family was the least of the tribe of Benjamin. (1 Samuel 9)

Zichri[edit]

Zichri was a son of Izhar of the house of Levi according to Exodus 6:21, born in Egypt. He was a nephew of Amram and a cousin of Aaron, Miriam, and Moses. Zichri was also the name of the father of Amasiah, one of Jehoshaphat's commanders according to 2 Chron 17:16.

Zidkijah[edit]

Zidkijah is mentioned in chapter 10 of Nehemiah.

Zillah[edit]

In Genesis 4:19, 22–23, Zillah (Hebrew: צִלָּהṢillāh) is a wife of Lamech and the mother of Tubal-cain and Naamah.

Ziphah[edit]

In 1 Chronicles 4:16, Ziphah (zī'fe) is mentioned as a son of Jehaleleel, a descendant of Judah.

Zippor[edit]

Zippor was the father of Balak, a prophet of Jehovah in Moab, in Numbers 22. He was a descendant of Moab, the son of Lot.

Ziphion[edit]

Ziphion or Zephon is a son of Gad (Genesis 46:16), and was the progenitor of the Zephonites (Numbers 26:15). There may be a connection with the angel Zephon.

Zithri[edit]

In Exodus 6:22, Zithri ("the Lord protects"), a Levite, was the son of Uzziel.

Ziza[edit]

Ziza (or Zizah) was the name of 3 biblical individuals:

Zobebah[edit]

Zobebah (also known as Hazzobebah)[75] was a son of Koz (1 Chronicles 4:8).

Zohar[edit]

For the Zohar found in a variant reading of 1 Chronicles 4:7, see Izhar.

Zohar or Zerah was a son of Simeon according to Genesis 46:10, Exodus 6:15, and Numbers 26:13.[76] He was one of the 70 souls to migrate to Egypt with Jacob.

Zoheth[edit]

Zoheth was a son of Ishi (1 Chronicles 4:20).

Zuar[edit]

Zuar was a member of the house of Issachar according to Numbers 1:8. He was the father of Nethaneel.

Zuph[edit]

Zuph or Zophai was an Ephraimite and an ancestor of Samuel, he was the father of Tohu or Toah according to (1 Samuel 1:1). He was the son of Elkanah (different from Elkanah the father of Samuel) according to (1 Chronicles 6:35). He is listed as being an Ephraimite even though he came from the line of Levi.

Zuriel[edit]

Zuriel ("My Rock is God") was the son of Abihail (Numbers 3:35). A Levite, Zuriel was chief prince of the Merarites at the time of the Exodus.

Zurishaddai[edit]

In Numbers 1:6, Rock of the Almighty ("Shaddai is my rock") was the father of Shelumiel, the prince of the Tribe of Simeon. He is mentioned in this context five times in the Book of Numbers.[77]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Numbers 3:21 NKJV
  2. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Likhi". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 2, E–K. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  3. ^ Williams, Nora A. (1992). "Maai (Person)". In Freedman, David Noel (ed.). The Anchor Bible Dictionary. Vol. 4. New York: Doubleday. p. 431. ISBN 9780300140811.
  4. ^ Fulton, Deirdre N. (2015). Reconsidering Nehemiah's Judah: The Case of MT and LXX Nehemiah 11–12. Mohr Siebeck. p. 156. ISBN 9783161538810.
  5. ^ a b Blenkinsopp, Joseph (1988). Ezra-Nehemiah: A Commentary. Old Testament Library. Westminster John Knox. p. 346. ISBN 9780664221867.
  6. ^ Mandel, David (2010). Who's Who in the Jewish Bible. Jewish Publication Society. p. 250. ISBN 9780827610293.
  7. ^ The Interpreter's Bible, 1951, volume V, page 1060.
  8. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Machnadebai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  9. ^ 1 Chronicles 8:9.
  10. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Malcham". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  11. ^ Frederic W. Bush, Art. Marsena In: David Noel Freedman (Hrsg.), The Anchor Bible Dictionary, Doubleday 1992, ISBN 3-438-01121-2, Bd. 4, S. 573.
  12. ^ "Chapter:-1----The Country of Arabia--Part One". January 2018.
  13. ^ "Harvard Mirador Viewer".
  14. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Matred". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  15. ^ Pulpit Commentary on 1 Samuel 10, accessed 1 May 2017.
  16. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Matthanias". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  17. ^ Richard S. Hess (15 October 2007). Israelite Religions: An Archaeological and Biblical Survey. Baker Academic. p. 144. ISBN 978-1-4412-0112-6.
  18. ^ (Adam Clarke, 1831, p. II 685)
  19. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Meshillemoth". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  20. ^ 2 Chronicles 28:12
  21. ^ Neh 11:13
  22. ^ Easton's Bible Dictionary - Mithredath.
  23. ^ T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Naharai". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  24. ^ a b T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black, eds. (1901) [1899]. "Nahath". Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  25. ^ Genesis 25:15; 1 Chronicles 1:31, 5:19.
  26. ^ Naphish - King James Bible Dictionary.
  27. ^ Theodor Nöldeke (1899). "Hagar". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black (eds.). Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 2, E–K. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  28. ^ he New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Engelwood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1990. ISBN 0-13-614934-0.
  29. ^ [Psalm 83#Verses 6–8|Psalm 83#Verses 6–8|Psalm 83 6–8].
  30. ^ Saadia Gaon (1984). Yosef Qafih (ed.). Rabbi Saadia Gaon's Commentaries on the Pentateuch (in Hebrew) (4 ed.). Jerusalem: Mossad Harav Kook. p. 33 (note 35). OCLC 232667032.
  31. ^ 1 Kings 11:26, 16:3.
  32. ^ C. H. W. Johns (1901) [1899]. "Nebuzaradan". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black (eds.). Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  33. ^ Nehemiah 6:14: King James Version
  34. ^ Esther 9:7 in the Bishops' Bible of 1568, accessed 30 December 2022.
  35. ^ Genesius, H. W. F., Gesenius' Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon to the Old Testament Scriptures: Numerically Coded to Strong's Exhaustive Concordance, with an English Index, published 1979.
  36. ^ "2 Samuel 21 Brenton Septuagint Translation". biblehub.com. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  37. ^ "Latin Vulgate Bible with Douay-Rheims and King James Version Side-by-Side+Complete Sayings of Jesus Christ". Archived from the original on 2019-02-12. Retrieved 2019-02-11.
  38. ^ Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Rechab and the Rechabites" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  39. ^ J. D. Douglas; Merrill C. Tenney (3 May 2011). Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary. Harper Collins. p. 1219. ISBN 978-0-310-49235-1.
  40. ^ Rannfrid I. Thelle; Terje Stordalen; Mervyn E. J. Richardson (16 June 2015). New Perspectives on Old Testament Prophecy and History: Essays in Honour of Hans M. Barstad. BRILL. p. 70. ISBN 978-90-04-29327-4.
  41. ^ Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Rehum". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black (eds.). Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 3, L–P. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  42. ^ "Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Book 4, chapter 7, section 1". www.perseus.tufts.edu. Retrieved 2021-01-02. ...and Rekem, who was of the same name with a city, the chief and capital of all Arabia, which is still now so called by the whole Arabian nation, Arecem, from the name of the king that built it; but is by the Greeks called Petra
  43. ^ Hammond, Philip C. (1980). "New Evidence for the 4th-Century A. D. Destruction of Petra". Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (238): 65–67. doi:10.2307/1356516. ISSN 0003-097X. JSTOR 1356516. S2CID 163457321.
  44. ^ NLT takes this interpretation, but in slightly different words.
  45. ^ L'Heureux, Conrad E. "The yelîdê Hārāpā': A Cultic Association of Warriors." Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, no. 221, 1976, pp. 83–85. JSTOR, https://www.jstor.org/stable/1356087.
  46. ^ Ronald F. Youngblood (7 March 2017). 1 and 2 Samuel. Zondervan. p. 913. ISBN 978-0-310-53179-1.
  47. ^ Meir Lubetski; Edith Lubetski (11 September 2012). New Inscriptions and Seals Relating to the Biblical World. Society of Biblical Lit. p. 47. ISBN 978-1-58983-557-3.
  48. ^ a b Sara Japhet (1 November 1993). I and II Chronicles: A Commentary. Westminster John Knox Press. p. 87. ISBN 978-1-61164-589-7.
  49. ^ Sara Japhet (1 November 1993). I and II Chronicles: A Commentary. Westminster John Knox Press. p. 250. ISBN 978-1-61164-589-7.
  50. ^ "Shammai from the McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia". McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2023-02-22.
  51. ^ International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, "Shammua."
  52. ^ Peretz Rodman, "Shelumiel — The First Schlemiel?", The Forward, 26 May 2006. This interpretation has been identified as a folk etymology. Klein in his Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language (1987), s.v. שלומיאל, interprets the term as a corruption of shelo mo'il (שלא מועיל) "useless" (cited after balashon.com, 18 December 2009).
  53. ^ Leviticus 24:15–16.
  54. ^ "Shelomith from the McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia". McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2023-02-24.
  55. ^ I Kings 16:24.
  56. ^ 1 Chron 2:31, 34–35.
  57. ^ Jewish Encyclopedia (1906), "Shimei."
  58. ^ Public Domain Hirsch, Emil G.; Price, Ira Maurice; Bacher, Wilhelm; Seligsohn, M.; Montgomery, Mary W.; toy, Crawford Howell (1901–1906). "Solomon". In Singer, Isidore; et al. (eds.). The Jewish Encyclopedia. 11. New York: Funk & Wagnalls. pp. 436–448.
  59. ^ The New International Version notes that "one Hebrew manuscript and Vulgate [have "Bathsheba"]; most Hebrew manuscripts [have] "Bathshua"
  60. ^ "1 Chronicles 3 Brenton Septuagint Translation". biblehub.com. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  61. ^ 2 Samuel 14:2
  62. ^ 2 Samuel 14:4
  63. ^ 2 Samuel 14:9
  64. ^ 2 Chronicles 20:20
  65. ^ "Amos". biography.yourdictionary.com. Retrieved 2022-12-31.
  66. ^ Bedford, Peter (1992). "Vaizatha (Person)". In Freedman, David Noel (ed.). The Anchor Bible Dictionary. Vol. 6. New York: Doubleday. p. 781. ISBN 9780300140811.
  67. ^ Holman Bible Dictionary
  68. ^ a b McMillion, Phillip E. (1992). "Zabud (Person)". In Freedman, David Noel (ed.). The Anchor Bible Dictionary. Vol. 6. New York: Doubleday. p. 1032. ISBN 9780300140811.
  69. ^ a b c Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1901) [1899]. "Zalmon (second entry)". In T. K. Cheyne; J. Sutherland Black (eds.). Encyclopaedia Biblica: A Critical Dictionary of the Literary, Political, and Religious History, the Archaeology, Geography, and Natural History of the Bible. Vol. 4, Q–Z. New York: The Macmillan Company.
  70. ^ "Strong's Hebrew: 6667. צִדְקִיָּה (Tsidqiyyahu or Tsidqiyyah) – "Yah is righteousness," six Israelites". biblehub.com. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  71. ^ I Kings 22:11.
  72. ^ The New Jerome Biblical Commentary, 1991, pp. 287–88.
  73. ^ The Interpreter's Bible, 1951, volume V, page 1021.
  74. ^ See New International Version, footnote.
  75. ^ E.g. New International Version.
  76. ^ See Shlomo ben Aderet: (responsa i., No. 12; quoted in the Jewish Encyclopedia): "one of the sons of Simeon is called Zohar in Gen. xlvi. 10 and Ex. vi. 15, and Zerah in Num. xxvi. 13, but since both names signify 'magnificent,' the double nomenclature is explained."
  77. ^ For the etymology, see David Mandel (1 January 2010). Who's Who in the Jewish Bible. Jewish Publication Society. p. 419. ISBN 978-0-8276-1029-3.

Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainEaston, Matthew George (1897). Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons. {{cite encyclopedia}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)